CD-SIPS2015_Volume
< CD shopping page

2015-Sustainable Industrial Processing Summit
SIPS 2015 Volume 4: Meech Intl. Symp. / Mining Operations

Editors:Kongoli F, Veiga MM, Anderson C
Publisher:Flogen Star OUTREACH
Publication Year:2015
Pages:275 pages
ISBN:978-1-987820-27-0
ISSN:2291-1227 (Metals and Materials Processing in a Clean Environment Series)

    Metal Hyperaccumulation: Phytotechnologies and Sustainable Mining

    Rachna Chandra1; P. A. Azeez2;
    1GUJARAT INSTITUTE OF DESERT ECOLOGY (GUIDE), Bhuj, Kachchh, India; 2SACON, Coimbatore, India;
    Type of Paper: Regular
    Id Paper: 322
    Topic: 4

    Abstract:

    Conventional mining, to extract metals economically, requires high grade ore and enormous investment. It also generates huge quantity of over burden / tailings. These tailings may contain other metals that could not be economically recovered by the mineral processing plants due to low concentrations. However, techniques making use of appropriate plant species comes handy in extracting metals in low concentrations distributed in low grade ore or mill tailings. Phytoremediation is another cost-effective, environmental friendly technology that can be employed for treatment of metal contaminated sites. It is reportedly feasible for exploiting the ores uneconomical to mine through conventional methods. For success of these technologies, continuous development and better understanding of the processes are imperative. In this context, we examine the present status of technology deployment, phytotechnologies for the extraction of metals by phytoremediation and implications for future research in this area.

    Keywords:

    Metal; Mining; Sustainability; Tailings;

    References:

    [1] S.Q. Khan, Y. Cao, M. Zheng, Y.Z. Huang and Y.G. Zhu: Health risks of heavy metals in contaminated soils and food crops irrigated with wastewater in Beijing, China, Environmental Pollution, 152(2008), 686692.
    [2] M.K. Zhang, Z.Y. Liu and H. Wang: Use of single extraction methods to predict bioavailability of heavy metals in polluted soils to rice, Communication in Soil Science and Plant Analysis, 41(2010), 820831.
    [3] M. Vidali: Bioremediation: an overview, Pure and Applied Chemistry, 73(2001), 1172-2001.
    [4] K. Perronnet, C. Schwartz and J.L. Morel: Distribution of cadmium and zinc in the hyperaccumulator Thlapsi caerulescens grown on multicontaminated soil, Plant and Soil, 249(2003), 19-25.
    [5] S. P. McGrath, Z.G. Shen and F.J. Zhao: Heavy metal uptake and chemical changes in the rhizosphere of Thlaspi caerulescens and Thlaspi ochroleucum grown in contaminated soils, Plant and Soil, 188(1997), 153-159.
    [6] A. van der Ent, A.J.M. Baker, R.D. Reeves, A.J. Pollard and H. Schat: Hyperaccumulators of metal and metalloid trace elements: Facts and fiction. Plant and Soil, 362(2013), 319-334.
    [7] I. Raskin and B.D. Ensley: Phytoremediation of toxic metals: using plants to clean up the environment, 2000, New York: John Wiley & Sons.
    [8] P.E. Olson, K.F. Reardon and E.A.H. Pilon-Smits: Ecology of rhizosphere bioremediation. In S.C. McCutcheon and J.L. Schnoor (Eds.), Phytoremediation: transformation and control of contaminants, 2003, Hoboken, New Jersey: Wiley-Intersciences Inc., pp. 317-353.
    [9] S.L. Hutchinson, A.P. Schwab and K.K. Baks: Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in the rhizosphere. In S.C. McCutcheon and J.L. Schnoor (Eds.), Phytoremediation: transformation and control of contaminants, 2003, Hoboken, New Jersey: Wiley-Intersciences Inc., pp. 355-386.
    [10] W.J. Doucette, B.G. Bugbee, S.C. Smith, C.J. Pajak and J.S. Ginn: Uptake, metabolism and phytovolatilization of tricholoroethylene by indigenous vegetation: impact of precipitation. In S.C. McCutcheon and J.L. Schnoor (Eds.), Phytoremediation: transformation and control of contaminants, 2003, Hoboken, New Jersey: Wiley-Intersciences Inc., pp. 561-588.
    [11] M.O. Mendez and R.M. Maier: Phytostabilization of mine tailings in arid and semiarid environments-an emerging remediation technology, Environmental Health Perspectives, 116(2008), 278-83.
    [12] J.R. Henry: An Overview of the Phytoremediation of Lead and Mercury. National Network of Environmental Management Studies (NNEMS), 2000, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
    [13] S.C. Barman and M.M. Lal: Accumulation of heavy metals (Zn, Cu, Cd and Pb) in soil and cultivated vegetables and weeds grown in industrially polluted fields, Journal of Environmental Biology, 15(1994), 107.
    [14] S. Dudka and W.P. Miller: Accumulation of potentially toxic elements in plants and their transfer to human food chain, Journal of Environmental Science and Health Part B-Pesticide Food Contamination, 344(1999), 681-708.
    [15] K. ChandraSekher, K. Rajni Supriya, C.T. Kamala, N.S. Chary and T. NageswaraRao: Speciation, accumulation of heavy metals in vegetation grown on sludge amended soils and their transfer to human food chain, Toxicological and Environmental Chemistry, 82(2001), 33-43.
    [16] I. Martin and P. Bardos: A review of full scale treatment technologies for the remediation of contaminated land, EPP Publications, 1996, Richmond.
    [17] H.M. Conesa, M.W.H. Evangelou, B.H. Robinson and R. Schulin: Critical View of Current State of Phytotechnologies to Remediate Soils: Still a Promising Tool?, The Sciencitific World Journal, 2012, doi:10.1100/2012/173829.
    &#8195;

    Full Text:

    Click here to access the Full Text

    Cite this article as:

    Chandra R and Azeez P. Metal Hyperaccumulation: Phytotechnologies and Sustainable Mining. In: Kongoli F, Veiga MM, Anderson C, editors. Sustainable Industrial Processing Summit SIPS 2015 Volume 4: Meech Intl. Symp. / Mining Operations. Volume 4. Montreal(Canada): FLOGEN Star Outreach. 2015. p. .